The current state of relations between Russia and the West precludes our reaching the level of cooperation required to combat terrorism. This could lead to nuclear confrontation or deployment of a ‘dirty bomb’. We are close to recreating the conditions that almost resulted in a nuclear conflict during the Cold War

William PERRY, former Secretary of Defense; Professor, Stanford University, speaking at the International Luxembourg Forum conference, “30th Anniversary of the Reykjavik Summit – Lessons of the Past and the Tasks for the Future”.

Amsterdam, June 7-8, 2016

Propaganda disseminated by North Korean leaders should not be taken at face value. However, should there be any provocation, North Korea may actually mount an assault. The probability of North Korea striking South Korean or Japanese facilities is much higher than on the U.S.

Jayantha DHANAPALA, President of Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, former United Nations Under Secretary-General for Disarmament Affairs, speaking at the International Luxembourg Forum Supervisory Council meeting

London, December 6-7, 2016

We need to call on the statesmen in Russia and USA to abandon reckless rhetoric and replace it with the language of mutual respect. This is an essential component in the relations between our two countries that control over 90 percent of the world’s nuclear weapons and materials. Otherwise we will end up in a situation of further escalation

Sam Nunn, former Chairman of the US Senate Armed Services Committee, Co-Chairman and CEO of the Nuclear Threat Initiative, speaking at the Joint Conference of the International Luxembourg Forum and the Nuclear Threat Initiative, “Preventing the Crisis of Nuclear Arms Control and Catastrophic Terrorism”.

Washington, December 1-3, 2015

Nuclear risks make it an urgent and pressing necessity to re-establish U.S.– Russian relations. The leaders of both states should recall the wisdom that former Soviet and U.S. leaders demonstrated during the Cold War after the Reykjavik Summit.

Viatcheslav KANTOR, President of the International Luxembourg Forum, speaking at the International Luxembourg Forum Supervisory Council meeting

London, December 6-7, 2016

Today, the world is facing two main threats. The first is nuclear weapons and the lack of understanding that their use threatens the whole world with immediate death. The other threat is global warming, which in turn subjects the planet to a slow death.

Hans BLIX, former IAEA Director General and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Sweden, speaking at the International Luxembourg Forum Supervisory Council meeting

London, December 6-7, 2016

The balance between the two nuclear powers, the U.S. and Russia, has always provided the foundation for strategic stability. START III gives the parties an opportunity to secure the transparency of their nuclear forces.

Vladimir DVORKIN, Chairman of the Organizing Committee, International Luxembourg Forum; Principal Researcher, IMEMO, RAS; former Director, Fourth Central Research Institute, Russian Federation Defense Ministry, Major General (Retired), speaking speaking at the International Luxembourg Forum Supervisory Council meeting

London, December 6-7, 2016

It is possible to disperse radioactive materials in the air with a conventional explosion and kill a lot of people. These materials are used in medicine. Islamists in Mosul have said that they have already extracted cesium from medical substances. They know where to find it all and how to use it.

Des BROWNE, Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors, the Nuclear Threat Initiative; former UK Secretary of State for Defense, speaking speaking at the International Luxembourg Forum Supervisory Council meeting

London, December 6-7, 2016

Both in the era of the USSR and nowadays, solutions to missile and nuclear issues have always hinged on the national leaders. It was often said that if experts failed to agree, then presidents should discuss and resolve an issue. With some leaders, the personality factor worked positively, whilst with others it exacerbated the situation

Vladimir LUKIN, member of the Federation Council of the RF Federal Assembly; Professor, National Research University 'Higher School of Economics'; member of Supervisory Council of the International Luxembourg Forum, speaking at the International Luxembourg Forum conference, “30th Anniversary of the Reykjavik Summit – Lessons of the Past and the Tasks for the Future”.

Amsterdam, June 7-8, 2016

In recent years, it has become trendy to act comfortable with the idea that nuclear weapons may be used.

Gareth EVANS, former Foreign Minister of Australia; Chancellor of the Australian National University, speaking at the Meeting of the International Luxembourg Forum’s Supervisory Council

London, December 6-7, 2016

Having the strategic goal of complete nuclear disarmament in future, we must focus today on the more pressing task of mitigating the risk of a nuclear conflict.

Igor IVANOV, President of the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC), former Minister of Foreign Affairs of Russia, speaking at the Meeting of the International Luxembourg Forum’s Supervisory Council

London, December 6-7, 2016

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